I Regret Shrugging Off Twilight

(Now, there’s another five words I have never imagined myself saying.)

I admit—back when Twilight rose to fame among teenage girls, I was quick to shrug it off. Back then, I was convinced that vampires and teeny-bopper love stories just didn’t mix. Add to that the fact that most of the addicts of the novel were girls (who are wont to be overly jumpy when talking about cheesy love stories), and you can imagine my aggressive indifference (if not distaste) for it.

Apparently, the capitalists of the movie industry, spotting the sizable demographic Twilight appealed to, decided to go ahead and convert the book into a movie for the silver screen. Oh boy, were these capitalists ever any happier—despite a fledgling global economy, Twilight the movie raked in something like $20 Million 20 minutes after it hit the Box Office. The movie aficionado in me finally caved into all the hype surrounding this (oh, clever marketing and teenage girls!), so this afternoon, a few friends and I headed down to the local cinema and caught a screening of Twilight.

Twilight is the story of Isabella (“Bella”, she insists) Swan and her romance with Edward Cullen, a cunning vampire, which occurs in the damp town of Forks, Washington. Edward’s family’s enemies take a bloodlusty liking to his girlfriend, jeopardizing her life. Edward goes through every hell on Earth to ensure the safety of Bella’s life. Soon, Bella’s mother is implicated into the situation, and she goes to save her—even if it means having to die.

The cast of Twilight. Credit: http://www.filmonic.com/
The cast of Twilight. Credit: http://www.filmonic.com/

The movie was made to appeal mainly to the teenage female demographic, and it did so very well. The uniqueness of the love story sets it apart from other teenage love dramas, although the vampire aspect of the movie may (and has) turned off some film buffs who have labeled it the “worst vampire movie ever”. Don’t be mistaken, though—although the story wouldn’t be what it is without the vampire element to it, it shouldn’t disqualify the movie for those of us out there who don’t like Nosferatu-type flicks. (It has been noted that the “vampire-resisting-human-blood” element of the movie may be a sort of metaphor for something more real, which I will discuss later.) My friend Marielle (who, like me, has not read the book and dissed the novel instantly) may have a point when she said that the movie was a bit too teeny-bopper, but then again, as I said, that’s the demographic it appeals to. Certain scenes in the movie can stir both women and men (well, at least me), and if you know how to listen, you can learn a pickup line or two from Edward to use in your dating misadventures.

(Okay, about the whole “I’m a vampire, and I could very well bite you in the neck” thing, I came across something on the Innarnetz (link forgotten; sorry) that said that Edward’s lust for Bella’s blood could be likened to a man’s sexual lust. As easy as it would be for Edward to simply suck Bella bone-dry, he kept himself back from temptation because of his love for her—something guys undoubtedly have difficulty doing (with some people *cough*classmateofmine*cough* failing to keep their pants on).)

For those of us who have not yet read the novel, the movie can ignite your interest in its novel version, and even the whole Twilight series in general. It’s the quintessential love story—something we all once liked, but have grown tired of, thanks to Hollywood—reengineered.

For its beautiful storyline and interesting uniqueness, but for its just-a-bit-too-cheesy teeny-bopper-ness, Twilight (2008) receives a Deantastic A-.

(Now, if you will be so kind as to give me a full set of the novels in the Twilight series, you may kindly ask for my shipping address by reaching me through my contact form. 😀 [Hey, it’s worth a try!])

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2 thoughts on “I Regret Shrugging Off Twilight

  1. might as well download an e-book (so that you can read it in the comfort of your own computer) or an audio book (if you'd prefer someone narrating the book to you word by word). just a suggestion.

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